5 Golden Rules To Training Your Puppy - Without The Headache Training

Discussion in 'General Dog Chat' started by zneve08, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. zneve08

    zneve08 New Member

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    5 Golden Rules To Training Your Puppy - Without The Headache

    Hey guys,
    We've just compiled a massive guide on how to train a puppy from start to finish that should cover every single obstacle owners face. If you're a new owner or thinking about adopting a puppy into your family this is an absolute must read. We've compiled tips and tricks from all the experts like Doggy Dan and Ceasar Milan so that puppy training is a breeze for you.

    We would absolutely love feedback from Breedia members. If you've encountered a problem that we missed or have some problems that require special attention post below and I'd love to help! Check out the guide here: [removed]
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  3. mjfromga

    mjfromga Member

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    zneve08 likes this.
    You won't get any love here with articles like that. This site doesn't believe in the Alpha or pack theories. This site doesn't believe that you have to be dominant over your dog to have a well behaved dog. This site doesn't believe everything has to be methodical.

    This site stands against people like Cesar Milan. He's a TV reality star, he isn't an expert on dogs. He's almost an idiot, challenging snarling dogs and being bitten over and over again. Foolish way to handle dogs.

    The calm freeze technique on a barking dog seems potentially dangerous and I cannot recommend it at all. Seems like something to potentially get you bitten in the face.
  4. My bear Yoji

    My bear Yoji Member

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    zneve08 likes this.
    I have to agree with MJ I wouldn’t challenge a snarling dog.
    I must say though I do take on some points Cesar Milan makes, plus, he is quite easy on the eye ! !
  5. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    GsdSlave likes this.
    In your previous thread you said that Moxie the Cavoodle was your first puppy. I congratulated you on solving her housetraining problem, but I do feel you could be jumping the gun by now offering advice on, 'every single obstacle owners face'.
    Compiling tips drawn from sundry sources and methodologies, (such as Cesar Milan), is not an ideal way of giving behavioural advice. I don't want to sound picky, but it might be a good idea to.wait until you have had more hands-on experience before offering to guide owners on which piece of advice to follow.
  6. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

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    Never heard of the The Calm Freeze method before, looked it up but the video I saw the dog was already calm, so not sure how it would work on a dog that was really agitated.
  7. mjfromga

    mjfromga Member

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    On an agitated dog... It doesn't seem like a good idea at all. I definitely would never tell people to do that.
  8. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

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    zneve08 likes this.
    Why do you think it’s potentially dangerous?

    He is talking about calming a barking or excited dog, not about controlling an aggressive dog.
    Quote
    The Calm Freeze:
    Here you simply crouch down.
    Take your dog by the collar, using an underhand grip, under the chin, palm facing up.
    Say nothing, look away and breathe slowly and deeply.
    Hold them for a couple of seconds until they are calm.
    Then release the hold and stand up…They will be much calmer
  9. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    zneve08 likes this.
    Or, in other words, ignore when they are being excitable. Nothing wrong with that. I don't see the relevance of holding the collar, but hey, ho, each to their own
  10. mjfromga

    mjfromga Member

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    Yeah I just was never keen on holding an agitated dog around the neck. But I guess if the dog isn't in aggressive mode, it's fine.
  11. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    Not really, Myra. An excited dog can soon become frustrated when being held by the collar which can quickly turn to aggression in a bid to get away from the restraint. I'm afraid Milan has a lot to answer for :(
  12. zneve08

    zneve08 New Member

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    Awesome feedback guys, thanks so much. Could you share with me some articles and videos you find relevant on the topic that you personally would follow when training a new puppy/dog? I'd love to check them out!
  13. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    Look up Sarah Whitehead. She offers some pretty good fact sheets on her site. All kind, fair and effective.

    There are a lot of reward-based trainers out there and lots of advice
  14. mjfromga

    mjfromga Member

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    Milan has nothing to answer for. He's a TV star. He is an expert in drama, not dogs. He even tells people to never do what he does. He knows it is dangerous. The dude is crazy as can be. The dog whisperer was never meant to actually train dogs, it was meant to excite people and entertain them.
  15. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

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    Millan has never claimed to be a dog "trainer", but says he rehabilitates dogs and trains the owners.
  16. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    Every trainer teaches the owner not the dog, but what you train owners to do varies greatly. I've never understood how anyone can expect to gain trust and create a bond by bullying (which a lot of Millan's work is about).
  17. mjfromga

    mjfromga Member

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    It is not necessarily bullying. It is asserting. It's like a parent telling their kid to do something or a boss telling an employee to do something. That is not bullying, it is within your roles to do those things and the other party really has no right to question you.

    What you say goes. You pay for everything, you own everything, and you are not asking, you are telling. If they are wise, they will do what you say. If they do not, then there will be consequences.

    These are dogs so it isn't that cut and dry, but the same applies. I don't believe in all the alpha stuff, but I do expect (require) my dog to do as he is told and not cause me trouble. I do not expect to be challenged, defied, or threatened. I expect to be obeyed.

    My dog is a good man and he is happy to do as he is told. His "mommy" is nice to him. She feeds him, pets him, and tries to make sure he is clean and well cared for. By treating your dog well, you can usually get what you want from the dog because he loves you.

    I do not fear dogs but I would not get in the face of a large snarling dog unarmed. This is a recipe for getting bitten like Milan did over and over again.

    Nigredo was mouthy as a puppy. I don't play around with using teeth. He was taken by the scruff, snatched off, looked in the eye, and chided "NO". This did not take long to work at all. I don't "redirect". I don't yell in pain. I STOP him firmly. This type of training is what you people call "punitive" but I have no issue with such training if it works and the dog isn't harmed. I didn't BULLY him, I just let him know that biting me will not be tolerated under any circumstances.

    The issue with a lot of what you see Milan doing is that it doesn't work and serves absolutely no purpose. This is why I just call it entertainment.
  18. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    What is the difference from causing fear/trepidation whatever you want to call it to bullying?

    I've always expected good behaviour from my dogs past and present, but I've never once threatened them. Positive isn't permissive it's just a gentler way of getting desired behaviour
  19. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

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    My point is, he doesn't "train" dogs to sit, down, stay, heel, fetch, roll-over, speak, etc.
    His technique is a ‘quick fix’ for severe behavioural issues and to rehab them in a short period of time.
    So maybe we just disagree on the definition of the word train.

    That doesn’t mean I agree with his methods’ or his focus on dominance/alpha (which is based on flawed wolf studies that have since been debunked)
  20. mjfromga

    mjfromga Member

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    Bullying is done by someone who has no authority and it is done not to accomplish anything usually, but merely to upset the other person. It also is usually done by a peer. Someone near the same age and whatnot.

    UK people tend to think differently than we do here. Parents spank their children here. They physically reprimand them. You guys don't believe in that. It isn't considered bullying. It's called discipline.

    If my puppy nips me and I remove him by his scruff, how is that bullying him? He should not have bitten me. It isn't like I just randomly scruffed him. THAT would be bullying him. It did not harm him and it had the desired effect. And my dog trusts me and is the most loyal and loving boy. I am nice to him, I just handle biting a bit more harshly.
  21. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    I'm afraid we are going to have to agree to disagree, Myra :(

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