Need Suggession Digestive Problems in My Samoyed Questions

Discussion in 'Samoyed' started by Zahra B, May 1, 2024.

  1. Zahra B

    Zahra B New Member

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    Zahra Batool

    Need Suggession Digestive Problems in My Samoyed

    I'm a proud owner of a wonderful Samoyed dog named Dabbi. She is 2 years-old and brings so much joy to my life. She's been having irregular bowel movements and occasional vomiting.
    We haven't made any recent changes to his diet, which has always been a mix of high-quality food.
    It made me worried
    1. Are there any particular supplements or home remedies that you would recommend to aid digestion?
    2. Should I consider switching to a completely different diet, like raw or homemade, and if so, what should I be cautious about?
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  3. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    CaroleC likes this.
    I first recommend that she see a vet. Sometimes, there can be underlying health reasons for a sensitive stomach and the vet can identify that. They can also provide advice on diets best suited for YOUR dog.
  4. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    Malka and Toedtoes like this.
    I agree that you will need to speak to a vet about your Samoyed's upset stomach. There are too many potential reasons to be able to provide advice on a forum.
    Typical things that the vet will want to ask you are - is your dog vomiting food, saliva or bile? What times of day does he vomit, and how is this related to his feeding routine? Are your dog's irregular bowel movements constipation or diahorrea - and what is the frequency?
  5. Lifew/dogs

    Lifew/dogs New Member

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    I have no doubt that the advice "go to a vet" is redundant in most posters' life. Been there done that, right Zahra?
    Try flora in packets for one meal a day. https://www.chewy.com/purina-pro-plan-veterinary-diets-en/dp/50010?
    FortiFlora Powder Digestive Supplement for Dogs
    Also freeze some pumpkin in ice trays then knock a few out for every meal.
    1. Are there any particular supplements or home remedies that you would recommend to aid digestion?
    2. Should I consider switching to a completely different diet, like raw or homemade, and if so, what should I be cautious about?
    GO TO A VET; such heart warming information which is what this forum supposed to do.
  6. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    When did this all start?

    If it's something she's always had, then it's worth trying out a few things, but if this is something that has recently started then it's likely to be more of a problem than just changing diet or trying supplements

    So, if it's something that has started recently, do please let your vet check her over before changing anything in her diet or adding stuff to her current diet because it could cause more upset
  7. dogwithsickness

    dogwithsickness New Member

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    Toedtoes and CaroleC like this.
    1. Consult a Veterinarian: First and foremost, I recommend consulting with a veterinarian to determine the underlying cause of Dabbi's digestive issues. Irregular bowel movements and vomiting can be symptoms of various health issues, including dietary intolerances, infections, gastrointestinal disorders, or other medical conditions. A vet can conduct a thorough examination, perform any necessary tests, and provide appropriate treatment recommendations.

    2. Dietary Adjustments: While you haven't made recent changes to Dabbi's diet, it's still possible that something in her current diet isn't agreeing with her. Your vet may recommend temporarily switching to a bland diet consisting of easily digestible foods such as boiled chicken and rice to give her digestive system a break. After consulting with your vet, you can gradually reintroduce her regular diet or consider transitioning to a different type of diet.

    3. Supplements: Depending on Dabbi's specific needs and the veterinarian's recommendation, supplements may help support her digestive health. Probiotics, for example, can promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut and aid digestion. However, it's essential to consult with your vet before starting any supplements to ensure they're appropriate for Dabbi and won't interact with any other medications she may be taking.

    4. Homemade or Raw Diet: Switching to a homemade or raw diet is a personal choice and should be done with caution. While some dogs thrive on raw or homemade diets, they may not be suitable for every dog, and they require careful planning to ensure they provide adequate nutrition. If you're considering this option, I recommend consulting with a veterinary nutritionist who can help formulate a balanced diet tailored to Dabbi's specific nutritional needs. Additionally, be cautious about potential food safety concerns associated with raw diets, such as bacterial contamination.
    Overall, the most important step is to consult with a veterinarian to determine the underlying cause of Dabbi's digestive issues and develop an appropriate treatment plan. They can provide personalized recommendations based on her health status and dietary needs.
  8. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    This lady has an unfortunate turn of phrase and a rougher attitude to training than the positive methods which are promoted by successful trainers these days. Training should be fun for both partners - not a battle won by bullying and pain.
    She chastises us for advising that a vet should diagnose the reason why a dog is showing a particular set of symptoms, and is quite happy to make recommendations based on a series of random internet links. She assumes that our posters would have already seen a vet, but I believe that it is far more likely that they will have already looked online - in fact it is likely that they came across the Breedia forum while doing an online search.
    I would like to point out that in the UK it is technically illegal for any person that is not a vet to diagnose or treat an animal - and it must be worse to offer a remote diagnosis. Personally, I don't possess a crystal ball. I am happy to talk about conditions that have already been diagnosed, and may even suggest methods that have worked for my dogs. However, I think it is dangerous to recommend using something like a probiotic while there could be the possibility that a more serious condition is not receiving prompt treatment.
    Rant over.
  9. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    I agree. It is also illegal for a non-vet to diagnose or treat an animal in the US.

    In addition, a quality vet would not diagnose or treat an animal based on a single post to an internet forum or social media. They would examine the animal: palpating the abdomen, listening to the heart, etc. Blood, urine and/or fecal tests. In addition, they would ask questions based on their extensive knowledge and experience to help make a diagnosis.

    In addition, providing treatments like probiotics can actually mask symptoms of a serious problem so that it takes even longer to realize something is seriously wrong.
  10. Lifew/dogs

    Lifew/dogs New Member

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    I have trained 7 of my own pack of German shepherds, we played 'freeze' and they all stopped and waited for ok. I trained puppies for GSD Rescues for many years. All my personal dogs were off-leash trained then attended intermediate classes for distractions. I also worked with shelter dogs more than 10 years in 2 states. I worked with trainers and watched protection demos all day long while they earned their degree, I watched all day long more than a few times as SCH dogs earned titles I, II and III. I didn't participate due to all the other dog related activities. When down to one male he earned his CGC. I wrote 3 novels about what owning a dog can do to harm them on Amazon Kindle. One book is the life of a litter of 10 pups of a backyard breeder and how their fate/life worked out for them. That book has 5 out of 5 stars. I was also an animal control officer handling many trained/untrained/friendly/unfriendly animals esp dogs. There were breeders and rescuers whose dogs got loose more than a few times. No kind of pos. reinforcement lured them home again or I'd have nothing to do.
    When some people use antiquated language many others won't understand doesn't mean a thing to me.Using folk sounds like an Amish non-growing person with little to add to anything. Th-th-that's all folks!
    Last edited: May 8, 2024
  11. Tone

    Tone New Member

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    Hi, I too had the same problem with my ESS but without the being sick, I asked these guys on here for advice aswell as going to the the vets, my springer is now in proplan fortiflora in his food and it’s a different dog again. No more having worry about going out with him and trying to clean up slop

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