A little "mouthy" Questions

Discussion in 'Cane Corso' started by Kash's Mama, Jan 25, 2021.

  1. Kash's Mama

    Kash's Mama New Member

    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Amber

    A little "mouthy"

    Hey everyone. I have a 13 week old Cane Corso named Marley and she is a sweetie. She has an older brother Kash, who is a Belgian Malinois. They play really well together. They do nip and play bite with each other, which I know is common. But we have been noticing some things about her. When she eats, she is a little protective of her food, but I have now started handling her bowl making it known that she is not to be aggressive with her food- this has helped.
    Kash and her love to share toys and play keep away or tug of war. But this morning, while her and Kash were chewing on their own antler, she took his and when he went to get it back, she growled at him. We are not sure if this is aggression or what.

    Any suggestions on what we could do to help her? Thanks
  2. Registered users won't see this advert. Sign up for free!

  3. Andrew Sheldon

    Andrew Sheldon Member

    Likes Received:
    247
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    Andrew
    Antler... Like a deers antler...
  4. Kash's Mama

    Kash's Mama New Member

    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Amber
    Yes.... deer antlers- natural ones. My Malinois loves chewing on them.
  5. Malka

    Malka Member

    Likes Received:
    7,771
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Juli
    I got some cut and split antlers for Tikva a while back but she did not want to know. Just kept the one piece in her "nest" for ages, then chucked it on the floor. In the end I gave them to my lawyer for his Labrador, together with the Himalayan Yak Cheese chews she also decided she did not want - after having happily chombled the first piece I gave her. :rolleyes:
  6. Andrew Sheldon

    Andrew Sheldon Member

    Likes Received:
    247
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    Andrew
    Himalayan Yak Cheese chews... Deer antlers.... You guys are making this stuff up.... :confused:
  7. Malka

    Malka Member

    Likes Received:
    7,771
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Juli
    Andrew - these are the ones I got for Tikva - the small size ones as she is only a little girl!

    ANTLERS.jpg


    [​IMG]
  8. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

    Likes Received:
    2,715
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Vee
    Malka likes this.
    Teach her not to take the other dogs bone away, tell her to leave it before she even gets it. Or recall her and trade it for something else.


    RE Antlers id be careful as they can cause broken teeth, especially in hard chewers.
  9. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

    Likes Received:
    2,715
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Vee
  10. Andrew Sheldon

    Andrew Sheldon Member

    Likes Received:
    247
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    Andrew
  11. Queensland blue

    Queensland blue Member

    Likes Received:
    252
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    S
    G
    Sounds like natural instincts to me , there is certain foods that dogs get more protective of .
    Like when they get bones from the butchers .

    good idea to get the dog used to you taking the bone off her , and that you will give it back so she trusts you before she gets too big where it can become dangerous .

    doesn’t sound too worrisome a problem to me at least at this point , provided you sort it out early .

    I am always careful to be fair to my 2 dogs and point out and tell them if they are not being fair .

    so I tell one hey that’s so and so’s bone , you don’t need to have 2 etc ,
    Then I can take it and distribute it fairly again and they understand what’s happening .

    sounds like pretty natural behavior for dogs to me you described though .
  12. Queensland blue

    Queensland blue Member

    Likes Received:
    252
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    S
    Another thing I will add , if you are going to have strong willed or dominant type breeds ,
    It will pay to do some homework on how to make sure you have control and are the boss .

    so as it doesn’t catch you on the back foot so to speak :)
  13. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

    Likes Received:
    5,007
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Carole
    GsdSlave likes this.
    My breed is one that is well known for resource guarding, in fact it is a major reason why Beagles can end up in rescue. I would not give your dogs any long lasting chews while this behaviour exists - separate the them and let them chew quietly in their own space.
    Never try to take a treasured item away from a possessive dog, always exchange for something of equal or higher value - a ball, a toy, or a small but really tasty treat.
    My breed are determined chewers and after several dental slab fractures I no longer give them any weight bearing bones, antler points, or the really large cow hooves.
  14. Queensland blue

    Queensland blue Member

    Likes Received:
    252
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    S
    It brought to mind some things .

    without passing any judgement on the person asking the questions .

    I’m not in any way directing them at the poster , merely pointing out my broad observations .

    as the relationship within communication / communicator is equally important as the different manners can get results .

    on the one hand ....
    my grandfather was a dog man , he lived on a farm and had sheep dogs .
    When he spoke to dogs with his big booming personality and voice , he had a serious tone matched with a kindness .

    his presence demanded a respect , and he communicated to dogs well and they would listen to him , they seemed to understand each other well .

    whether it was “don’t you bloody dare ! “

    or “come up here and have a scratch on the ear ”

    there was an open clear channel of communication .

    on the other hand I once had a friend who had a pup sent up from my brothers on the plane .

    the guy was English “don’t know if that counted for much if anything “

    however I used to joke and when the pup wouldn’t listen to him , I’d say “he can’t understand your accent mate :)

    then I would tell the pup to do the command and he would respond and do it .

    this made my friend pretty frustrated which as we used to wind each other up was pretty amusing .

    He had a mumbled voice that was kind of monotonous and da da da da melodic in a certain low-ish tone . If you can picture that.

    I realize as I get older maybe what’s passed on early in life as communicating with dogs , as something we can take for granted , may not be so natural for others .

    so I don’t know if there is a book written for how to train dogs for all people which would be universal .

    as is mostly the case with trainers like Caesar Milan and others , it’s about training the humans involved more so than the dogs .

    as they lack understanding , correct energy , and all those things to begin .

    I do expect puppy classes would be helpful to many people ,

    I also think people should “read the manual “
    On the breed they get , as it is not simply some side note that a certain breed does ‘such and such’.
    With people wondering why the dogs do what they do or compensate for their imbalances in the manners often destructively .
  15. Kash's Mama

    Kash's Mama New Member

    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Amber
    We've done the Yak Cheese Chews with our Malinois...haven't thought of getting them for our Cane Corso. May have to give it a try.
  16. Kash's Mama

    Kash's Mama New Member

    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Amber
    Thank you all for your responses. We are currently preparing our Malinois for a month-long training coming up which will give us time to work with our Cane Corso. We have also started correcting her "bad habits" when we see them- like being a little too "protective" of her food bowl when I try to pet her. I stopped that real quick. I believe getting help when needed- the reason we are sending our Mal to training- not that he is a bad dog in any way, he just needs some refining. I'm hoping the time he is away will lead to more training time with our girl.

    Again thank you all for your advice and tips.
  17. who owns who

    who owns who Member

    Likes Received:
    1,261
    Gender:
    Male
    Name:
    Marc
    GsdSlave likes this.
    I personally am totally against sending a dog away for training. I think you will find almost everyone on here will agree with me. That training, or refining as you say, should come from you, possibly with the help of a good positive trainer. It helps deepen the trust and bond between you and your dog. Sending your dog away for training is not like sending your kid to summer camp.
  18. GsdSlave

    GsdSlave Member

    Likes Received:
    2,715
    Gender:
    Female
    Name:
    Vee
    Personally I would never send any of my dogs away for training, for me owning a dog, is the journey, bonding, training, going through all those awkward stages and learning about my dogs.

    I would be very careful about who I sent them to for several reasons. Sending them away might get temporarily result but who knows how? No one knows what those trainers do to your dog to get them to listen.

    (I have seen dogs come back a shadow of themselves) others reverted back to they way they were as dogs will act differently with different people, you would still need to work with a trainer with your dog, It does no good if the dog works perfectly for the trainer, but doesn't for you.

    It will be cheaper and more rewarding for both of you to find a positive, reward-based training class and sign up, and have fun!

    As with local trainers, board and train trainers, do your research, just because someone claims they have done "x", does not mean it is true.

Share This Page