How long to train? Questions

Discussion in 'Belgian Shepherd Dog (Malinois)' started by Marine6212, Sep 30, 2022.

  1. Marine6212

    Marine6212 New Member

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    How long to train?

    I dropped my Malinois off at the breeder/trainer on August 13, 2022, for 2 weeks of basic obedience training. This is his 7th week of training. The trainer is asking for more time to train him. I miss my dog and want him home! The wife thinks the dog won't remember us and will be aggressive towards her/us. Should we just drive for 6.5 hrs to pick him up or leave him with the trainer?
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  3. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    Bring the dog home and take him to a training class where YOU work him. It will build a better bond and you will know exactly what training methods are being used on him.
  4. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    Get him home as quick as you can. Something sounds very off to me.

    As Toed says, find a training class or have individual sessions with a trainer nearer to you. Go alone at first and make sure the methods they use are kind and that you can get along with the trainer.

    Any reputable trainer will allow you to go and observe a class before booking in with your dog
  5. Kristinne

    Kristinne New Member

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    I'm sorry but 7 weeks? This doesn't sound right. Did they send any videos/pictures of your dog recently?
  6. tundraman

    tundraman New Member

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    bring your dog home you should be working with your dog it will create a strong bond
    find a trainer near you or a club
  7. Marine6212

    Marine6212 New Member

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    Went and picked him up Saturday, Azreal has a stubborn streak and is e-collar dependent. He will heal now and stay in a down position until called. He waits in door ways until told to free. His father and mother were both on site and Azreal has 5-10lbs weight on both of them and he's only a year old.
  8. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    Chris B and CaroleC like this.
    Dogs aren't stubborn - you (the trainer) have simply failed to find an incentive for them OR to clearly explain what you want them to do.

    E-collars are cruel. They punish the dog for the trainer's errors and teach the dog to obey out of fear. It's like beating your child so they do well at math.

    If the trainer was using e-collars, they were also using other aversive tools and methods to beat your dog into submission.

    The only reason why dogs are "e-collar dependent" is because the trainer has failed to train the dog.

    The best way to train a dog is to use positive reinforcement to encourage desired behaviors and redirection to discourage unwanted behaviors.

    I find it very very sad that you: 1) sent your dog away with people who abused and tortured your dog to force it into behaviors; and 2) couldn't be bothered to spend the time with your own dog to teach it desired behaviors in a positive manner AND build a bond between you and the dog.
  9. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    Whatever an old fashioned trainer might tell you, E collars only work because they threaten your dog with punishment if he doesn't comply. That is not the way to establish a happy working relationship with your four-legged family member.
    The Malinois is a beautiful breed, but not a dog that I would recommend for a novice dog owner. This is a high drive breed, which is why it is often the choice of service personnel who need a dog that can put in maximum effort for a full working shift. You are going to need some help so look for a trainer who uses ONLY reward based training methods.

    * For an introduction to the positive methods of dog training, try to get hold of a copy of, 'The Culture Clash', by Jean Donaldson, published by James and Kenneth. Karen Pryor's, 'Don't Shoot the Dog', Ringpress Books, is another which compares the effect that different training options have.
    You can find a lot of positive dog training material on the internet too, but reading is not a substitute for a good trainer.
  10. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    Match a high drive dog with an e-collar and all you will end up with is the collar being turned up and up and up and the dog resisting at every turn of the dial. By the time they have any measure of success, they have to break through the pain barrier as when the dog is training and his adrenaline kicks in, he simply won't feel the lower levels at all. Can you wonder why the trainer you sent him to failed?

    Find what motivates him. Make training fun and let him think that training and his successes are his idea and you'll find training progresses faster and you have a dog who wants to work with you
  11. jamessteven

    jamessteven New Member

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    please i also have problem training our new puppy that was brought home, any advice ?
  12. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    CaroleC likes this.
    Here is a new book that provides great insight: https://www.amazon.com/How-Raise-Pu... A Dog-centric Approach&qid=1666727277&sr=8-1

    This book recommends using positive methods, lots of attention, and unconditional love.

    You don't indicate how old the puppy is, how long you've had the puppy, nor what problem you are facing.

    In general, training a puppy/dog is not instantaneous. It takes months and months and oftentimes months for him to learn your rules.

    You need to make a lifelong commitment to give him the attention and guidance he needs to grow up into a fine dog. That means standing outside in the rain, snow, heat, etc, while he works out that you want him to potty outside. It means taking him outside every one to two hours so he doesn't have accidents inside. It means having to put aside your wants and focusing on his needs. Itmeans giving him attention even when you are busy doing dishes, etc. It means NOT putting him in a crate because you are tired of him.

    Give him love, redirect him from behaviors you don't like (such as giving him a chew when he tries to chew the table leg), reward him for behaviors you do like (and reward him big), and give him all the attention he wants. Don't isolate him, don't punish him, don't reprimand him.

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