Westie won't eat after being spayed Health

Discussion in 'West Highland White Terrier' started by Mitch91, Apr 4, 2019.

  1. Mitch91

    Mitch91 New Member

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    Westie won't eat after being spayed

    Hi all! I have a 1-year-old westie named Bowie that was spayed last Thursday. The operation went well. She was prescribed carprofen 40mg for pain management. The day after surgery she didn't want to eat, which according to the vet is normal. She did poop a little on the day after though. However, after two days she still didn't want to eat and she was shaking/shivering. On Sunday she still didn't want to eat and she began throwing up bile. So, I've decided to take her to the emergency vet, where she received a shot (maropitant citrate) to treat her nausea and also received Tramadol pills for her pain. She didn't have a fever and her incision looked really good according to the vet.

    On Monday Bowie still didn't want to eat. Luckily she didn't throw up anymore. To be certain, I took her to her vet the same day. She received a special dog liquid food, some sort of DogSure. I was told to give her that 6 times a day 10mg and that would increase her appetite and by tomorrow she should be eating normal again. She didn't have any fever that day either. She also received Metoclopramide pills for her nausea and stomach problems.

    Today is exactly 1 week after her surgery and she still doesn't want to eat. I took her to the vet today again. The vet told me that everything looks normal, she doesn't have a fever, heartbeat looks good, the incision is healing perfectly. Although, he does hear some sounds in her intestines, but is not certain what exactly could be wrong with her. So he suggested that Bowie stayed the night at the vet for fluid treatment because maybe she has problems with her kidney or liver and due to the anaesthesia she received during surgery might have affected her.

    Does anyone have experience with a similar situation? I don't know what else to do. I have already spent a lot of money at the vet. :(
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  3. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    Sorry, personally I can't help. I have never had any problems at all after having a bitch spayed. I wonder whether an ultrasound scan would give a clue to what is happening. I can only hope that you have some answers soon, or that Bowie turns the corner and finds her appetite. Best wishes - do let us know what develops.
  4. Malka

    Malka Member

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    I am sorry but I cannot help either. No bitch that I have ever had spayed was given any pain medication nor seemed to need it, and were back to normal almost instantly. Bowie seems to have been stuffed full of pain medication and then nausea medication. Perhaps either or a combination of those are the problem?

    As for the suggestion that "maybe she has problems with her kidney or liver and [which] due to the anaesthesia she received during surgery might have affected her" a simple blood test will show if she has problems, not "maybe".

    He said "everything looks normal, she doesn't have a fever, heartbeat looks good, the incision is healing perfectly" and yet he does not seem to have a clue why Bowie does not want to eat but keeps suggesting more money-costing things, such as keeping her overnight for fluid treatment - what is he going to suggest next? I would not be happy with a vet like that.

    I really hope that Bowie starts eating again and is OK.
  5. Malka

    Malka Member

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    @Mitch91 - how is Bowie? Is she eating yet?
  6. Mitch91

    Mitch91 New Member

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    After getting her first fluid treatment she began eating again and is very active. The vet performed some blood tests and it appears that Bowie's creatine levels are high and she had an infection. She got antibiotics to treat this. Today she went to the vet again for a checkup where they took small blood samples. When picking her up today the assistant told me that her results came well, that the infection is gone, however, her creatine levels are still high and that she received fluid treatment again today. The assistant told me that Bowie has to come in on Monday for blood samples and fluid treatment (again) and that tomorrow the vet himself would contact me.

    When researching online I found that certain antibiotics can falsely raise creatinine readings. So, I'm thinking of taking Bowie to another vet to perform some tests and see whether it is really necessary to keep giving her fluid treatment and to make sure I'm not getting scammed by my current vet.
  7. Malka

    Malka Member

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    Something tells me that your vet sees $$$$ - what exactly are these "fluid treatments" that he he keeps giving Bowie? That you never see and have to leave her for? And what antibiotics? Did he tell you what they were for?

    As for his assistant telling you that Bowie has to come in on Monday for blood samples and fluid treatment [again] and that tomorrow the vet himself would contact you - why not contact you today? An assistant is not a qualified vet so has no right to tell you what to do.

    And yes, I think you are being scammed. Left right and centre.
  8. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    A slightly different opinion I'm afraid.
    Does Bowie seem to be eating and drinking normally?
    If so, I think you could question the need for further fluid therapy with your vet. However, if she is drinking either too much, or too little, I would trust that he is doing the right thing in trying to protect your girl's kidneys. Urine tests are much cheaper than blood tests, (at least they are at my vet), could he perhaps monitor her creatinine level via her urine to keep the costs down?
    I would be trying to keep Bowie on a low protein diet until she gets the all clear.
    Best wishes.
  9. Malka

    Malka Member

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    Sorry Carole, but a vet assistant telling me I have to take my dog for blood samples and fluid treatment yet again - WHAT fluid treatment? I trust my vet, not a vet assistant.

    And no way would I leave a dog for "fluid treatment" or some unknown antibiotics without me knowing exactly what on earth they were or for what they where.

    Would you trust a nurse to treat you and not a doctor? Or a vet assistant to treat your Beagles and not a qualified vet?

    I do not pay vet fees for one of his assistants to treat my dogs. Would you?
  10. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    My guess is that the vet asked the assistant to make the explanations. It frees up more time that way.

    I very much doubt that the assistant has performed any of the procedures, however, I'm sure if you phone and tell them you are worried, the vet will call you personally
  11. Malka

    Malka Member

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    I was probably wrong - just the thought of a vet tech taking blood samples and giving fluid treatment, what ever that is, seemed just not right. Please do not forget that Pereg had to have blood drawn every three months, and no way would Ram let one of his techs do it. I would trust them but I trusted him more. I sat there until results came through.

    And what on earth are "fluid treatments" especially when you have to leave your dog there to have these "treatments"?
  12. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    GsdSlave likes this.
    RCVet nurses are highly qualified in this country, and they carry out many minor procedures that used to only be carried out by vet. surgeons. Eddie's blood draws have been taken by a senior nurse, and I am quite happy with that. If she can administer and maintain anaesthesia, she is more than capable of taking a blood sample.
    We have a team of practice nursing sisters at our local medical centre. They are able to run clinics, examine patients, and to issue prescriptions for items such as antibiotics. They will always call for a doctor's opinion if in any doubt, and I have always been quite happy to be seen by them.
  13. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    Fluid treatment. I don't know what this would contain - possibly little more than a saline drip, but it would need to be given over a period of time, not just injected in the clinic.
  14. who owns who

    who owns who Member

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    Many many years ago I had an old cat with kidney issues. The vet showed me how to give him fluids at home thru drip bag, they called it a camelback, as it left a little hump on his shoulders until it absorbed in
  15. Malka

    Malka Member

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    This is what I did not know. Years ago vet assistants were just that. They assisted the vet. Life has changed so much since then and I have difficulty in understanding how much things have improved now.

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