Afghan Hounds - far removed from its origin? Discussions

Discussion in 'Afghan Hound' started by Kanie, May 6, 2013.

  1. Kanie

    Kanie New Member

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    Margaret

    Afghan Hounds - far removed from its origin?

    I am fascinted by Afghan Hounds!

    Many years ago, when I was looking for a rescue dog, a lovely chap who had many years' experience with this breed asked me if I'd considered one. I asked immediately about the grooming and he admitted it was time-consuming, but assured me I should not be put off.

    I decided it was not the right choice at the time, but I did do a lot of reading up on the histroy of the breed and purely out of curiosity (I don't have the right home for one right now - I know that already) I have started reading a bit of what's available on the internet in temrs of information.

    My main question is, current advice seems to be that the coat needs snoods, coats, socks, onesies - just to enable the hound to go outside or eat!

    So, back in the day, when they were kept as working dogs in Afhanistan, Pakistan, Iran etc., who did all this grooming? I'm guessing they had much less coat, or at least coat of a different texture, (like my teflon spaniel) or were routinely clipped somehow?

    Is the profusion of coat purely an invention / evolution for the show ring?

    I've read older accounts of Afghans being more of a multi-purpose animal than just a flat out fast-moving sight-hound. One account talked about the hounds patrolling the palace at night and being quite effective guards.

    How can a breed get so far removed from its origins...............or has it?!

    I'm just genuinely curious:)
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  3. Lindy Raynolds

    Lindy Raynolds New Member

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    Hello,

    I am glad you brought up the point as it is something I have wondered about too. I guess it's one of those cases where they just know how to take care of them selves when they are in their natural habitat. I mean when they were kept as working dogs in their native lands, they had to take care of themselves and they are pretty good at it.
    I have never come across anything that said that the Afghans had shorter coats back in those days. Also, they must have had different grooming requirements due to the different climatic conditions of the Middle East. And after all, isn't it quite normal that the affectionate owners would do anything in their power to make their dogs look more graceful and be as comfortable as possible? I mean, they are not working dogs anymore, but gorgeous, exotic pets that deserves every care they can get.
  4. CaroleC

    CaroleC Member

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    This is an old thread Lindy (2013), don't be disappointed if there is no reply - but Margaret might well still be around!
    I think that coats in all show breeds have become more glamorous since the 1950's. Undoubtedly it is a trait that has been deliberately bred for, but specialised nutrition must have played a big part too.
    Welcome to Breedia.
  5. Kanie

    Kanie New Member

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    Margaret
    Wow! This is a blast from the past. Thanks for your posts, Lindy and Carole :) I know some of the older photos do show dogs with far less coat and casting my mind way back (1989!!!) when I read all about them, I recall that when they were first brought over here, there was more than one distinct type.

    ....and I'm still curious to know more, so if anyone else wants to help revive an ld thread - please do!
  6. absolude

    absolude New Member

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    How about another revival of an interesting discussion? Only a year has passed this time...
    My opinion is that the coat of today's dogs is a result of selective breeding. First dogs brought from Afghanistan weren't as heavily coated.
    I have spoke to a few afghan people and they all said the dogs back home were "not as beautiful" as the ones here.
    As a side story, one man said he used to hunt deer and was familiar with them. My female Afghan Hound, usually shy of newly met men, went straight up to him and looked in his eyes, not afraid at all.
    I have owned the breed for 24 years now and like most people admire a nicely groomed hound, but I wish they weren't as heavily coated.
    It is a pain for a dog to be every other day on the grooming table, especially when older.
    Also, when meeting people first question is "how long and often they need to be groomed".
    I think is a disservice to the breed functionally too. Just imagine the state of a hound's coat after a day's running free into the bush, or the life of one kept away from running freely in the nature.
    If it had less hair, the Afghan Hound would have less admirers but more people would own them. They'd be much happier during summer. My female is breathing heavy from a walk in hot weather while the male I keep short haired is suffering less.

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