Camping with Dogs Discussions

Discussion in 'General Dog Chat' started by Toedtoes, Aug 17, 2021.

  1. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    Helidale likes this.

    Camping with Dogs

    Here in the states, camping has gained in popularity since Covid19, so I thought I would share some tips for camping with dogs that I have learned over the years. Most can be applied in other countries.

    1. Follow the rules of the campground. If dogs must be on a leash, then keep yours on a leash. If dogs are not allowed on trails, then don't take them on trails. And so on. If people keep ignoring the rules, then the campground gets tired of enforcing the rules and they end up banning dogs altogether.

    2. Don't take your dog around the campground to potty - even if you clean it up. Have your dog do its business in your campsite. Think about it: if you don't let your dog poop in your campsite, why would someone else want your dog pooping at their campsite. If you're out walking and the dog has to go, then pick it up.

    3. Your dog doesn't have to be a perfect camper. As long as you show that you are working on issues, most campers will understand. That means not letting your dog bark nonstop - make the effort to teach your dog and as campers see you doing that, they will be understanding when he does bark. My Bat-dog had people issues and I always made the effort to work with her - I had many campers over the years not just understand but actually help her see that people were good.

    4. Don't leave your dog alone outside for even a minute. That's all it takes for a loose dog, coyote, etc, to get to your dog. If you go in the camper/tent, bring the dog in with you. Tie outs and exercise pens will not protect your dog from being attacked.

    5. When hiking/walking on trails, move off the trail for others to pass. Some people are afraid of dogs and trails are very narrow.

    6. Make sure your dog is chipped. Also, always have an ID tag on your dog. The ID tag should not only include name and number, but the license plate number of your vehicle and/or camper. That way if your dog gets loose, you can be found in the campground even if there is no cell phone service.

    7. Don't use expandable leashes. If the campground requires a 6ft leash, then only use a 6ft leash. If there is no restriction, then use a longer leash that you can pull in hand-over-hand - you will have better control.

    8. Keep a copy of required vaccinations (eg, rabies) in your vehicle and/or camper. If something happens, that certificate can be the difference between your dog being quarantined or going home with you.

    9. If there are no leash requirements, keep control of your dog. Don't let her wander into other campsites or run loose. Keep the dog with you and under control. Other campers don't want to have your dog visiting them - whether in their campsite or out and about.

    10. If the campground states "do not leave your dog unattended" that includes leaving them in your camper while you go out sightseeing, etc.

    11. Make your dog part of the fun. Don't just put him on a tie out for the duration. Find campgrounds that are dog friendly - national forest, COE, BOR, and BLM campgrounds most always allow dogs on trails. National parks rarely allow dogs on trails.

    12.If you choose to go to campgrounds where dogs are not allowed on trails, etc, then find work arounds. If the weather is cool enough, try https://www.amazon.com/XianghuangTe...ds=window vent for car&qid=1629239604&sr=8-10. They allow you to keep the windows lowered while preventing your dog from hanging out or others from reaching in. Have one person stay back with the dog while the others go hiking, etc.

    13. Read campground warnings and take appropriate action. If there are venomous snakes in the area, then don't let your dog dig or poke under rocks, logs, holes, etc. If there are disease warnings, make sure your dog is vaccinated. If no vaccine is available or your dog is not vaccinated, then make sure your dog does not engage in risky behavior. For example, if leptospirosis is in the area, don't let your dog drink from ground water or eat stuff off the ground.

    Camping and dogs go together like scotch and soda. With a bit of common sense, courtesy, and planning, you can enjoy nature with your best friend at your side.
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  3. who owns who

    who owns who Member

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    Toedtoes and Helidale like this.
    That is a nice list. Basically you are explaining how to be smart, kind and courteous. It’s kinda sad that many people really need this list
  4. Helidale

    Helidale New Member

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    A good checklist. All common sense points, and considerate to other campers.
    My addition,
    Check in advance, and always have the contact details for the nearest vet where they can be located quickly.
  5. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Member

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    Most of these work at home too. It just makes for a much more enjoyable time.

    Yeah, dog owners get mad when I suggest they have their dogs poop at home and leave the walks for exercise. They seem to think their dogs HAVE to walk the neighborhood (or campground) to poop. And then they get upset because some neighbor doesn't want the dog pooping or peeing on their property (or campsite) - "but I pick it up" or "but it's just pee".

    Knowing where a vet is nearby is a big one. I can't believe I forgot it. Both my sibling and dad had one of their dogs go into seizures during a camping trip (different dog on different trips) - scary.
  6. Queensland blue

    Queensland blue Member

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    You have covered quite a bit there toedtoes.

    I really liked this short movie ,hope you don’t mind me adding here as it’s camping with a dog related and i think a well made nice vid .
    there is a bit in there where a hare gets butchered for food (if that is an issue don’t watch kids )

    otherwise , enjoy !

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