Rise of canine DNA testing kits Controversial

Discussion in 'General Dog Chat' started by Malka, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. Malka

    Malka Member

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    Rise of canine DNA testing kits

    Leading DNA brand Wisdom Panel says more than one million dogs have been tested with its kits since it launched in 2007. But while most owners test for fun, others are uncovering a worrying trend.

    Some experts warn that as many as one in ten dogs sold as pedigree are, in fact, mongrels.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ing-kits-used-doting-owners-exposes-scam.html

    Something worries me about this. If the KC is registered as purebreds according to the DNA brand Wisdom Panel says it is, how can anyone be sure that their dogs are actually purebred?
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  3. Chris B

    Chris B Member

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    Malka and Challis87 like this.
    I must be a bit strange (OK, I am a bit strange), but I can't see the point of DNA testing unless you are trying to claim compensation from the breeder.

    Once a dog is home, all that matters is the love we give them and the love they give back. All the rest is immaterial.
  4. Malka

    Malka Member

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    Whilst I agree with the article regarding:
    I do wish the article had got simple things correct. The first picture shows the owner holding two Dachshund, and Albie, who she had already suspected was not a pure Dachshund because of his unusual black and white coat, is on the left, so Chester must be on the right. The second picture shows the owner holding Chester, who is bigger than a miniature Dachshund so could be part standard one, but that second picture is captioned that the dog in the picture is Albie, the one the who is on the left in the first picture.

    Tbh I cannot see much Doxie in Albie. The shape of his skull is wrong, his ears are set at the wrong place and angle, and face is too short. The only Doxie-looking part of him that shows is the angle of his right front paw. And the shape of Chester's skull looks too domed, nor does he have Doxie eyes.

    But I guess that any long-backed, short-legged, long face, large floppy ears could be called what they want it to be.

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